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THE SIXTH VOLUME.

Article.

Author,

No. Page

AT THE ASSOCIATED PRESS OFFICE.....

.Wm. Aplir.

XXXI. 23

A Woman's Right...

.Mrs. M. C. Ames. 48, 183, 422, 537

ARCTIC AURORA..

.Geo. Kennan. XXXII. 197

APARTMENT Houses...

.P. B. Wight.

XXXIII.

306

ARCTIC TRAVELLING IN WINTER.

.Geo. Kennan. XXXIII. 313

A LITTLE FURTHER ON.

... Caroline Howard. XXXIV. 435

ANTIQUITY OF CELTIC LITERATURE,

Prof. L. Clarke Seelye. đó. 387

AHMED-FORTUNES OF .

.J. W. Morris. XXXV. 802

AMERICAN LANGUAGE..

W. W. Crane.

do. 519

BRONTÉS (THE) AND HAWORTH

Mrs. E. P. Evans, XXXIII. 278

CAN AN INEBRIATE CONQUER HIMSELF ?..

.F. H. Norton. XXXII. 163

CONSTITUTIONAL Crisis in ENGLAND..

Prof. Goldwin Smith. XXXII. 214

CRABBED AGE AND YOUTH...

.E. C. Stedman. XXXIII. 255

Celtic LITERATURE-ANTIQUITY OF.

Prof.L. Clarke Seelye XXXIV. 387
CHAPTER ON Dogs ...

... Caroline A. Halbert. XXXV. 495
CAUSES OF THE FRENCH-PRUSSIAN WAR..

.Prof. C. A. Eggert. XXXIV. 430
DISRAELI AS STATESMAN AND NOVELIST.

.J. M. Bundy.

XXXI. 87
DISENCHANTED REPUBLICAN......

XXXI. 101

Danish PEASANTS...

.C. Petersen. XXXIII. 318

DOMESTIC ROMANCE-MORE OF THE.

XXXIV.

363

Dogs-SOCIALLY CONSIDERED

Caroline A. Halbert. XXXV. 493
Editorial Notes

.Parke Godwin. 109, 227, 334, 457, 560
FAIRY ISLAND...

.C. F. Woolson. XXXI. 62

Fox (Tue). .

..John Burroughs. XXXIV. 371

FOLK-Songs.

.. Rev. J. Vila Blake. do. 441

FRENCH INFLUENCE AT THE VATICAN..

. Rev. Dr. Keatinge. XXXV. 477

FORTUNES OF AHMED..

.J. W. Morris.

XXXV. 602
His Honor's DAUGHTER..

.0, M. Ellsworth. XXXI. 71
King's SENTINEL, THE, [Poem].

.R. H. Stoddard. XXXI. 9
LOVE in Fiji; I....

.Edited by T. M. Coan, M.D. XXXI. 30

II..

do.

XXXII. 129

do.

XXXIV. 408

LOWELL, Jas. RUSSELL (SONNET].

.J. H. Ewer.

XXXII. 151

LIFE-MAGNET, A Tale.....

.A. A. Adee.

do. 152

LAST OF THE PROUD PULSIFERS ..

.Mrs. J. G. Austin. XXXIV. 397

LINCOLN (PRESIDENT) AND THE PETITIONERS.

.M. Wentworth, XXXV. 527

LITERATURE AT HOME......

.R. H. Stoddard. 116, 234, 339, 460, 563

LITERATURE, ART, AND SCIENCE ABROAD.

..C. T. Lewis. 122, 239, 345, 463, 566

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Article.

Author.

No.
LOTA'S MISSIONARY FIELD...

XXXV.
MUSIC IN NATURE...

.Prof. Schele de Vere. XXXII.
MADAME LAFAYETTE AND HER MOTHER... ..Miss S. F. Cooper. 1 XXXII.
MAKING ICE BY STEAM...

.John Phin.

do.
MONTAUK....

.F. H. Angier.

XXXIII.
MALVINA

Mrs. J. V. Eames. do.
MAN IN THE Moon...

.Prof. Schele de Vere. XXXV.
Now I LAY ME DOWN TO SLEEP...

.F. Barrow.

XXXII.
NEW YORK SOCIETY IN OLDEN TIME....

.Bishop Kip. XXXIII.
NORTHWEST BOUNDARY QUESTION

.Gen. Alvord. XXXIII.
NEW STORY OF GEN. PUTNAM.

J. Franklin Fitts. XXXIV.
Our EARLIEST ANNALIST.

.Prof. G. W. Greene. XXXII.
Private GALLERIES OF N. Y., II. Mr. J. T. Johnston's.Eugene Benson. XXXI.

III. Mr. M. O. Roberts'. . Eugene Benson. XXXIV.
PEDRO EL MORO, THE SWORD-MAKER.....

.N. A. Knox. XXXIII.
PASSION-PLAY AT OBER-AMMERGAU.

.Lucy Fountain.

do.
PRUSSIAN-FRENCH WAR-CAUSES OF.....

.Prof. C. A. Eggert. do.
PEKING-PILGRIMAGE TO......

.Rev. E. W. Syle. XXXV.
PARIS-ON THE 4TH SEPT., 1870..

Young American. do.
Rosetti, PAINTER AND Poet...

.W. J. Stillman, XXXI.
RAILWAY MUSINGS..

..J. H. Vosburgh.

XXXIII.
RECONCILIATION (Poem)..

.Edgar Fawcett. XXXIV.
SALMON-FISHING ON THE NIPISSIGO IT..

..Thaddeus Norris. XXXI.
SUMMER SONG...

.. Ada W, Adams. XXXII.
Salt-WATER ETHics.

.S. Osgood, D.D. XXXIII.
SOCIETY versus INSANITY..

.W.A.Hammond, M.D. XXXIII.
SHAKESPEARE IN GERMANY.

.Prof. J. M. Hart. XXXIV.
To FRANCES-[POEM...

.T. Buchanan Read. XXXI.
THE BRONTÉS AND THEIR HOME.

Mrs. E. P. Evans. XXXIII.
TO A FALSE MISTRESSE..

.F. T. Lawrence. XXXIV.
WILD BEES.....

..John Burroughs.

XXXI.
WHAT THEY ARE DOING IN MEXICO....

.J. E. Brown,

do.
YACHTING....

..Sidney Hyde. XXXII.

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UPON a time, unbidden, came a man
Before the mighty king of Teberistan,

When the king saw this daring man, he cried,
“Who art thou, fellow ?” Whereto he replied,
“A lion-hunter and a swordsman, I,
Moreover, I am skilled in archery :
A famous bowman, who of men alone
Can drive his arrows through the hardest stone.
Besides my courage, tried in desperate wars,
I know to read the riddle of the stars,
First in the service of Emeer Khojend,
Who, friend to none, has none to be his friend,-
Him have I left, I hope, an honest man,
To serve, if so he wills, the Lord of Teberistan."
To whom in answer: "I have men enow,
Stalwart like thee, apt with the sword and bow;
These no king lacks, or need to: what we need
Are men who may be trusted—word and deed;
Who, to keep pain from us, would yield their breath,
Faithful in life, and faithfuller in death."
“ Try me.” As thrice the monarch claps his hands,
The Captain of the Guard before him stands,
Amazed that one, unknown of him, had come
In to the king, and fearful of his doom.
Sternly his lord: “You guard me, slave, so well
That I have made this man my sentinel."
Thus did the happy archer gain his end,
And thus his sovereign find at last a friend,
Who from that hour was to his service bound,
Keen as his hawk, and faithful as his hound.

Now when a moon of nights had ta'en its flight,
Amid the darkness of a summer night,

Fintered, in the year 1870. by O. P. PUTXAM & 30N, in the Clerk's Ofice of the District Court of the U. S. for the Southern District of N. Y.

VOL. VI.-1

The king awoke, alarmed, with fluttering breath, Like one who struggles in the toils of death, And wandered to his lattice, which stood wide, Whence, down below him in the court, he spied A shadowy figure with a threatening spear. “ What man art thou l-if man-and wherefore here?” “ Your sentinel, and servant, O my lord !” “ Hearken !” They did. And now a voice was heard, But whether from the desert far away, Or from the neighbor-garden, who could say ?

So far it was, yet rear, so loud, yet low; “ Who calls ?" it said. It sighed, "I go! I go!"

Then spake the pallid king, in trouble sore,
“Have you this dreadful summons heard before ?”
“ That voice, or something like it, have I heard-

(Perchance the wailing of some magic bird)
Three nights, and at this very hour, o king!
But could not quit my post to seek the thing.
But now, if you command me, I will try,

Where the sound was, to find the mystery."
“Go! follow where it leads, if anywhere,
And what it is, and means, to me declare;
It may be ill, but I will hope the best :
But haste, for I am weary, and must rest.”
Softly, as one that would surprise a thief,
Who might detect the rustling of a leaf,
The sentinel stole out into the night,
Nor knew that the king kept bim still in sight,-
Behind him, with a blanket o'er his head,
Black-draped down to his feet, as he were dead;
But the spear trembled in his hands, his knees
Weakened ;-at length he sank beneath the trees.
Again the voice was heard, and now more near

Than when it faded last-it was so clear, :
I go! What man will force me to return ? "
“Now," thought the wondering soldier, “I shall learn

Who speaks, and why.” And, looking up, he saw
What filled his simple soul with love and awe-
A noble woman, standing by his side,
Who might bave been the widow or the bride
Of some great king, so much of joy and woe
Hung on the perfect lips that breathed, "I go,"
Shone in the quenchless eyes, dimmed the brigbt hair-
No woman, born of woman, half so fair!
“ Most beautiful! who art thou?" Know, Oman,
I am his life, who rules in Teberistan--
The spirit of your lord, whose end is nigh,
Except some friend—what friend - for him will die.”
“Can I?” But she: “'Tis written you must live.”
“What, then,-my life rejected, --can I give ?"
“ You have a son,” she whispered in his ear,
Feeling her way, it seemed, in hope and fear,
Lest what she would demand should be denied.
He pressed & sudden hand against his side

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