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The Students' Series of Latin Classics

THE

BELLUM CATILINAE

OF

C. SALLUSTIUS CRISPUS

EDITED

ON THE BASIS OF SCAMALZ'S EDITION, WITH AN

INTRODUCTION AND A VOCABULARY

BY

CHARLES GEORGE HERBERMANN, Ph.D., LL.D.,

PROFESSOR OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE IN THE COLLEGE
OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, EDITOR OF SALLUST's “ JUGURTHINE

WAR,” AUTHOR OF “BUSINESS LIFE IN ANCIENT ROME”

ού πόλλ αλλά πολύ

BENJ. H. SANBORN & CO.

BOSTON, U.S.A.

1903

COPYRIGHT, 1890, 1900,
BY CHARLES GEORGE HERBERMANN.

648115

Norwood Press
J. 8. Cushing & Co. - Berwick & Smith

Norwood Mass. U.S.A.

PREFACE.

This edition of Sallust's Bellum Catilinae is based on the third edition of the work by Director J. H. Schmalz.

Director Schmalz's extensive scholarship, his profound knowledge of the grammatical and stylistic peculiarities of the Latin prose writers, and his experience as a teacher, eminently fitted him to edit the writings of Sallust for the class-room. The favorable reception his Sallust has had in Germany, proves that it fully meets all the requirements of the latest scholarship.

In adapting Schmalz's work to the needs of American schools, his text which in the main is Jordan's has not been changed, except as regards the punctuation. This has been altered, so as to conform to American usage. As in the United States Sallust is most frequently read by students who are not so far advanced in their Latin studies as those for whom Schmalz's book was prepared, additional notes on grammar, style, and translation have been added wherever it seemed useful. For the same reason a departure has been made from Schmalz's practice in another particular. While he confines his historical comments to the narrowest limits, it has been thought best here to make them as complete and helpful as possible. The Introduction is entirely independent of Schmalz.

In preparing the historical matter, frequent use has been made of the Jacobs-Wirz edition of Sallust. For the grammatical notes, besides Schmalz, I have had recourse to the editions of Jacobs-Wirz, Dietsch, and Kritz; also to Inaugural Dissertations by P. Schultze and F. Uber, to a Programm by Dr. Prammer, and to Wölffin's Archiv.

In conclusion I take pleasure in thanking Director Schmalz for his courteous permission to make his Sallust the basis of the present edition of the Bellum Catilinae. To Prof. E. M. Pease, the editor-in-chief of this series, I am deeply obliged for many and important suggestions; also to Prof. J. K. Lord. Both of these gentlemen, moreover, had the kindness to read the proof with the greatest care and conscientiousness. Lastly, I return thanks to Dr. J.C. Morgenthau and Mr. J. F. Mulqueen, of the College of the City of New York, for repeated and courteous aid given me in the progress of the work.

CHARLES GEORGE HERBERMANN.

NEW YORK, March, 1900.

PUBLISHERS' NOTE.

Dr. Herbermann has thoroughly revised his Sallust — for ten years the best edition published in this country — and, to better adapt it to young students, has given before the text, helpful Summaries of Chapters. References are also given to all the leading Grammars. It is believed that in Introduction, Summaries of Chapters, Text, Notes, and Vocabulary, everything needful has been done to adapt the book to Secondary School use. An edition without the quantity marks can be furnished upon special request.

INTRODUCTION.

I. LIFE OF SALLUST.

C. SALLUSTIUS CRISPUS, or Sallust, as we usually call him, was a native of Amiternum, a town of some importance in the Sabine hills. Born in the year 86 B.C., the year of Marius' death, he may be said to have been cradled amidst revolution and bloodshed. His boyhood and youth were no more fortunate. Rome was assailed by war from without and disorder from within. Mithradates in Asia (78–63 B.c.) and Sertorius in Spain (78–72) for years defied the power of the imperial republic. In Italy Lepidus (78) renewed the terrors of civil war, and Spartacus for two years (73–71) led his army of gladiators and revolted slaves up and down the peninsula, scattering death and dismay. Rome itself was the scene of riots and bloodshed. Ambitious young ruffians, like P. Clodius, at the head of armed mobs, took possession of its streets. Honors and power were the reward of bribery and lawless violence. Scenes like these must have left their impress on the clever and aspiring youth from the Sabine hills. Ambition, he himself tells us, seized his soul.1 It would have been strange, had he kept his heart and mind uncontaminated by the prevailing corruption.

When Sallust left Amiternum for Rome, we do not know. Nor are we better informed about the progress of his education. All we can say is, that when he plunged into the current of Roman politics, he had already made serious studies in Greek and Latin literature. A passage in the Bellum Catilinae 2 suggests that even before entering upon his political career, Sallust

1 Bellum Cat. III. 4.

2 Ibid. IV. 2.

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